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ProjectComment presents the community of deviantART a project that will question what it really means to be a commenter, an artist, a member of deviantART. All of these challenges relate to commenting in some shape or form, and we sincerely encourage everyone to take part! :la:

You do not have to be brilliant at writing comments and we are not asking you to perform miraculous feats. We are just looking for people willing to make a difference. It is all too easy to receive constructive comments, but giving them is equally, if not more, rewarding.



Each week, a challenge is set with the deviations of those who participated in the previous week featured in a news article. Many thanks to CameronKobe, kaotic-cass, RetSamys for participating in Week 41!

Molly by kaotic-cass Of Mice and Books by RetSamys



Participate in this week's comment challenge…

Give three constructive comments to different users that have joined and uploaded a deviation on the same day.

:iconsomeconfettiplz:



Guidelines

:bulletblue: Once you have commented, link us to your comment in a reply to this article!
:bulletblue: The comment must be newly submitted to deviantART from today's date.
:bulletblue: Please try to include something along the lines of: "Commented on behalf of ProjectComment's 52 Week Comment Challenge" in your comment!
:bulletblue: Feel free to follow our guide on How to Comment - Pointers and Examples. If you are struggling with the concept of a constructive comment, this should help!
:bulletblue: You may do this challenge as many times as you want!

:star: Those who complete the challenge successfully will be featured in a news article, and the one who completes the most challenges successfully will win themselves a 12 Month Premium Membership. There will also be :points: given to the best efforts!

Have Fun! :love:
ProjectComment is a Group of many projects centred around comments, but, more importantly, constructive comments. We offer Members of deviantART a lot of opportunities to get comments, give comments, participate in comment projects, win points, get featured and much, much more!

In this series of articles, our admins aim to answer questions about anything related to comments/commenting, art and more! Here are our answers to RetSamys's question:

My group is opening a Critique folder. Is there anything you can recommend?



:iconfelizias: suggests, "One of the most important things would be to build up a system that rewards not only those who submit to the folder but also those that critique. :)"

:iconqbeagle: suggests, "Be sure that the pool of people that will be offering the critiques is pretty large.  You don't want one or two people doing all the critiques as they'll probably burn out pretty quickly.

Regardless of who is doing the critiques be sure to thank them.  As Felizias suggested you can make it a trade deal where making critiques gets you something in return.  People tend to put more in when they'll get something back.  I do want to say that even with such a reward don't ignore a simple "Thank you!" note.  If you spot some recurring names offering critiques let them know you appreciate their efforts.

Much like 3wyl has done here be sure to remind folks that any constructive feedback is beneficial.  Remind the members that they don't need to be professional artists or art critics to give the critiques.  Useful feedback comes in all forms, whatever their background or skill level their thoughts can be valuable."

:iconastarayel: suggests, "Give people some prompts for what constitutes constructive feedback. Sometimes it's easier to zero in on one aspect of a piece of art or literature--such as color, negative space, proportions, or word choice, grammar, etc.--than it is to look at something and feel like they don't know where to start. This is especially important in drawing people out of their comfort zones where commenting is concerned: it doesn't really matter if they're familiar with fractals or not, they have an opinion on what's a good color combination and what's not and that's what they should found their comments on.

Also, I think a good approach to critiquing is to sandwich the critiques between compliments. Just because there are improvements to be made doesn't mean that we shouldn't acknowledge what the artist did well!"

:icondtkinetic: suggests, "I think critique groups and folders work best when there's some kind of circulation. The most common type is the kind you see here, people constructively comment in order to have their work accepted into the folder (I'm sure there are other methods if you brainstorm). With this way, people are participating in the group rather than just dumping their work and moving on. Also, it's not just a separate group A that critiques group B, (which is fine in some scenarios) but this way there's more coverage, a guarantee of feedback, and distribution on who critiques what.

Oh, and try to keep things up to date on the folder and invite anyone who hasn't gotten feedback (after some length of time) to request that someone review their work."

:iconastrikos: suggests, "For maximum exposure to the folder, if possible, try to promote the folder through polls from everyone; but definitely utilize your journals and group blog. Feature it on the front page, as well as on your own personal profile.

Secondly, people often need an initiative and a reward system. This could be anything from features, to points, to critiques for their own work. You could also feature all the art within your critique folder every once in a while, for further exposure.

Notes are often useful for requesting people to finish critiques, or asking them to send you a note for the critique they did in exchange for a critique request or feature.

Hopefully with the right amount of exposure and reward, the critique folder will actually provide critiques instead of a submit and run stock pile. :heart:"


Do you have any suggestions? If so, post them here! :la:



If you have questions that you would like us to answer, please ask here as a reply to this blog, or anonymously through this form. Our volunteers will then answer your questions to the best of our abilities, and we will then post our answers as an article for you!

Thank you for reading!

ProjectComment :dalove:

ProjectComment is a Group that provides Guaranteed & Constructive comments for the deviantART community.

In order to support those efforts, we encourage dedicated users to give comments too. For those who are critics, artists, or just helpful in the community, we now offer something in return for all that you do - be it helping the participants of ProjectComment, or the group itself!

This weekly article focuses on the amazing deviants in the deviantART community, who have given fantastic comments, through excerpts of those comments, artwork by the deviants themselves, and much more! Your support in :+fav: the article would be much appreciated. :heart:



Spotlight Commenters

These commenters are determined by you through Nominations (read below for more information). Each month, we will be selecting a couple of amazing commenters based on the comments we have seen in our gallery submissions and elsewhere on deviantART. Anyone on deviantART is applicable for this feature!

:iconvivyi:, Vivyi, Varied, Hobbyist
Commented on Merciless Vigilante by DTKinetic.

Merciless Vigilante by DTKinetic
"  Although I am not familiar with the character, I can still perceive that he might be an innocent onlooker. If I'm right, then he is someone who tends to live outside the box. His expression, combined with the background all initiate that he's someone who doesn't belong, and of this might seem like he's an outcast of some sort, which is (from what I'm guessing) something you may/may not have been looking for. The anatomy definitely needs some work, one leg is slightly smaller than the other one and stands awkwardly at a keel. He looks a bit stiff where he stands, adding some movement would really help with the anatomy. We lean on one foot most of the time, so portraying this in our works is key to helping establish a good balance point in anatomy, and making our characters come to life. It helps when we are doing guidelines to draw a curved line representing the spine and connecting it to the head (or a circle). This states movement. Guidelines are quite helpful in all matters, and I'm not sure if you do them or not, but they are extremely helpful for getting what we need out of our characters. [...]"

Here is a selection of art created by Vivyi.
Simple Secrets: A Netheron Short StorySometimes secrets should stay secrets. Mae could never understand this.
She was but a simple child, a child of simplicity, and she never desired complicated things. She would always go out of her way to help her strangers, without a cent in mind, but by far she wasn't wasting dollars. Drusilla got her nothing, not a dime a dozen. She was  broker than most. 
She began denying this, after the death of Ms. Lucelle Lumata.
Mae picked up the book from the top of her shelf. She dusted it off. It held a look of promise. The words were complicated, with medical terms that she could not word in her mind. A nurse had been her calling, as she told Drusilla plenty.  She had high hopes to be like Ms. Lucelle Lumata.  Ms. Lumata worked at the hospital clinic, breathing life into new babies. Mae went to hospitals when she was sick- but she never stayed long, not ever at all. The amount of disease kept her away, and the desperate people scared her. But Ms. Lumata, always comforted
Alternate Universe Elsa by Vivyi Dreams made of SteelA ticket for
                          every wound
 
cures all
                        even the absurd
 
chasing
                           and catching

   each dream
amongst the clouds

Have a browse of their Gallery!


:icontana-jo:, TaNa-Jo, Varied, Hobbyist
Commented on A touch of FranticS! by Sakululla.

A touch of FranticS! by Sakululla
"I will try to help you to improve with your drawings ^-^

- proportions : Well a lot to do but dont give up :D Everyone starts like this c: It is a good start that you gave your characters rounded elbows and arms but the faces... you should round them more... they have no chin and humans do not have that sharp cheek bones!...  all in all you should look at tutorials how to do anatomy :D

- lineart. You used vectors here right? You should use line thickness to give the drawing a nicer look a like :D It looks all very sharp with the thick lines and the coloring. Use thin and thick lines and it will look much better :D

- coloring: Okay you are  working with hard-shading. You must know where the shadow must be since some shadows make no sense here :o
[...]"

Here is a selection of art created by TaNa-Jo.
Nazi Germany - Head potrait by TaNa-Jo Germany over the clouds by TaNa-Jo APH Germany and Prussia - Battlefield Of Tears by TaNa-Jo
Have a browse of their Gallery!


:icontearsdissolved:, TearsDissolved, Deviant
Commented on VH:Fly by StudioIJB.

VH:Fly by StudioIJB
"First off, the person has cross-eyed, and the eyes don't have white color that surrounds the irises.
Although the mouth's tongue is blurry, the mouth itself is fine.
The left hand felt unnatural and a bit random, so the left hand needs to spread out.
The hair lacks the variety; the artwork can be fixed by adding different sizes and width of each hair strands.
The legs felt awkward, and thus, the audience does not know if the Izzy jumped or tripped.
Using pose line as the guide line will help to improve this artwork.
[...]"

Here is a selection of art created by TearsDissolved.
Fear the War by TearsDissolved CE: Nostale: Wait for 2014 by TearsDissolved Megami Saga CE The Samurai Girl by TearsDissolved
Have a browse of their Gallery!

Do you know of a potential Spotlight Commenter? If so, we take nominations. Feel free to note ProjectComment!




Comment?

Consider commenting on one or more of the below!

City by Moonlight by seangregory Daria by ShyKitsune Bengal tiger! by dolphinsrock101

If you want to be in for the chance of being featured, feel free to submit to this folder!



How To Nominate


We need nominations of deviants who you think should be featured! Send us a note with the subject "Nomination" and the following information:
    :star: Name of Deviant

    :star: Links to the deviations they commented. (This is great way to give back to a user who has given you an exceptional comment!
:bulletgreen: You can suggest anyone and everyone (except yourself ;P) at any time and include as many nominations as you want in one note.
:bulletgreen: The news feature occurs once every week and all nominations will be taken into account.
:bulletgreen: If your nomination isn't featured immediately, it may still be featured in a future news article!


3wyl, posting on behalf of ProjectComment
ProjectComment presents the community of deviantART a project that will question what it really means to be a commenter, an artist, a member of deviantART. All of these challenges relate to commenting in some shape or form, and we sincerely encourage everyone to take part! :la:

You do not have to be brilliant at writing comments and we are not asking you to perform miraculous feats. We are just looking for people willing to make a difference. It is all too easy to receive constructive comments, but giving them is equally, if not more, rewarding.



Each week, a challenge is set with the deviations of those who participated in the previous week featured in a news article. Many thanks to CameronKobe, StudioIJB, Malintra-Shadowmoon, QBeagle for participating in Week 40!

Sunny by StudioIJB Spider-Man by QBeagleA Real Highlander :) by Malintra-Shadowmoon



Participate in this week's comment challenge…

Constructively comment on one deviation each from What's Hot, Undiscovered and Daily Deviations

:iconstarewoooplz:



Guidelines

:bulletblue: Once you have commented, link us to your comment in a reply to this article!
:bulletblue: The comment must be newly submitted to deviantART from today's date.
:bulletblue: Please try to include something along the lines of: "Commented on behalf of ProjectComment's 52 Week Comment Challenge" in your comment!
:bulletblue: Feel free to follow our guide on How to Comment - Pointers and Examples. If you are struggling with the concept of a constructive comment, this should help!
:bulletblue: You may do this challenge as many times as you want!

:star: Those who complete the challenge successfully will be featured in a news article, and the one who completes the most challenges successfully will win themselves a 12 Month Premium Membership. There will also be :points: given to the best efforts!

Have Fun! :love:
ProjectComment is a Group of many projects centered around comments, but, more importantly, constructive comments. We offer Members of deviantART a lot of opportunities to get comments, give comments, participate in comment projects, win points, get featured and much, much more!

In this series of articles, our admins aim to answer questions about anything related to comments/commenting, art and more! 
This week's question was provided by 8Hope24:

Question: 


"For a while now I feel like I have hit a wall in my development as an artist. I have been self-taught for the most part, though I have used 'how to draw' videos and the like, but I feel like I may have come to the point of needing further help. Where do I go for help?" 

Answers: 


:iconqbeagle: QBeagle:  "As I'm teaching myself using traditional media I know what you mean about the vast majority of tutorials being for digital art.  This doesn't leave those tutorials without value, just you need to tease out the information you can use.  For example with hands the same process of building up from basic shapes and guidelines can be used digitally as well as traditionally, you just swap photoshop layers with light lines and a kneaded eraser.

When it comes to texture and coloring digital concepts won't work.  For this I haven't found any resource better than a library.  There are loads of great books for traditional drawing methods.  I've become quite fond of the books by Andrew Loomis and Burne Hogarth, so if you use the same library I do you'll have time getting them as I repeatedly check them out.  

For coloring you have to get specific to the medium you like.  I go for colored pencil and have found that Capturing Soft Realism in Colored Pencil by Ann Kullburg and Colored Pencil Painting Bible by Alyona Nickelsen covered some great techniques.  For whatever media you should be able to find books by searching Amazon and bringing the ISBN numbers to the library.  You could buy them right from Amazon, but I prefer looking them over before putting money down and the library is more than happy to oblige.

Of course the most common and basic advice applies, Practice.  Find photos of whatever you want to work on and draw them.  Find drawings made by other artists try to figure out what lines they felt were most important, then recreate their drawing.  You'll eventually pick up on the basic shapes to look for and build up your own techniques." 



:iconfelizias: Felizias
"In addition to what QBeagle said you can always turn to the community for advice. :) (Smile)
There are a lot of artists struggling with those problems. I'm no traditionalist myself but I know there are a lot of improvement and feedback groups there you can get help from similar artists. 
Have you tried getting advice using our comment systems yet? :? (Confused)
For improvement I recommend :iconimprovement-club: where you can get detailed overall feedback and advice.
If you know some great artist who can do what you would like to, just try and ask them how they do it. It is always a huge compliment to be asked about your techniques and I know a lot of artists out here would be more than happy to help and be an inspiration." :D (Big Grin)



:iconmidorimurasaki: MidoriMurasaki: "For a deeper approach to anatomy, try finding/buying some books about 'artistic anatomy'. 


Places to looks: libraries, book shops, even search for pdf books. 

The best books on this subject have clear drawings and a lot of writing too, for it is essential to read about the matter too, and perhaps even photographs of models in various positions and showing anatomical details.
I strongly recommend reading them in libraries with pencil and paper near.

Being a self-taught artist is impressive, but always be open to others' teachings. Books are your best friends! Reading online for a long time will tire you unnecessarily.

You get better at drawing details by lots of exercising, so don't be afraid if the result is messy, continue exercising and you will get hold of those lines! Key is don't be afraid to 'tackle' a detailed object and try many times. Also, I suggest using 0.05 mechanical pencils/pens/liners for detail drawing, as 'overloading' the page with them is unlikely, they allow drawing many small things together and still looking well and clear."



:iconj-grey: J-Grey"I understand your problem. I think a lot of artists had such situation, when you feel that you’re stuck in your drawing level. I went to different art courses, and particularly all them were for traditional drawing. So I highly recommend to find some art courses in your area. In you current situation, when you feel that online resources are not that effective, real teacher’s advice may help more. Though, I understand that it may be expensive. It also takes time.

So I’ll try to explain one method I learned when I went to illustration course. It works for any drawing style and technique. Though, you will need to search through a lot of books/resources, but I see that it’s not new for you :D (Big Grin) 

First of all, look at any of your pictures with background. I believe that there are a lot of things you want to improve (because the real artist is always a bit unsatisfied). It may be anatomy, composition, furniture, landscape, etc. So the key is to study each of the parts of your artwork.

1. Still life

Some may find it boring nowadays, but it’s a really important part of any art. Search for good examples, try to find what makes some of them ‘live’, what composition works better.

Take one object (only one) and draw it. The key is to make such simple composition interesting. Use the light source and background.

Make a composition from multiply objects of different shapes and forms and draw it. ex1 

2. Interior

Same scheme here. Every part starts with study of examples.

Here, find more about perspective. Draw a real interior (your room, for example). Keep in mind that there are no empty places in it – a blank wall is not completely blank, it has shadows, wall paint, cracks, etc. Study different textures and materials. Draw a fantasy interior. It’s good to find the description in a book and draw it. ex2

 3. Landscape and architecture ex3

 4. Add a character in the interior and landscape. When you add characters, don’t forget about the background. They should behave in it. Animals go here too. ex4

 5. Dialogue

Try to draw a dialogue between inanimate objects ex5

 6. A group of characters (3-5) ex6

It’s just a brief explanation, so I still suggest showing your process for someone qualified for more advice. I encourage you to find your own examples in the style you like!

If you want to improve in anatomy, I totally agree with other suggestions about using books. There is a good online resource www.posemaniacs.com/ Anatomy is where quantity will slowly get you quality. Try such challenges as 'Draw 50 hands'. 

 Hope it will help you a bit and keep drawing." :D (Big Grin)

Do you have any suggestions? If so, post them here! 



If you have questions that you would like us to answer, please ask here as a reply to this blog, or anonymously through this form. Our volunteers will then answer your questions to the best of our abilities, and we will then post our answers as an article for you!

Thank you for reading!

ProjectComment I love deviantART!

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